Classic Cars that Stood the Test of Time

Collecting, restoring, or attending classic car shows have been a popular American tradition for decades. We’re often drawn to sleek lines, engine performance, and luxury features of collector cars. However, there is only a handful of the best classic cars that can truly withstand the test of time. Classic cars that signify the best American engineering, innovation, and muscle money can buy. Below are the top 5 best classic cars that will never go out of style.

1965-’66 SHELBY MUSTANG GT-350

65 Shelby Mustang with OEM Wheels

Credti Via Flickr

In 1965, the average price of a Shelby Mustang GT 350 was just over $4,500, a price that only a small group could afford. The Shelby is highly sought after by collectors as there were only 562 of the 1965 model sold in the U.S. The GT-350 had a race car dynamic with a 0-60 acceleration in 6.5 seconds and often used for drag racing. The Shelby can easily measure up to the big boys of muscle cars today with an 8-cylinder 306 horsepower engine, optional racing stripe, and Cragar mag wheels with an average value of $371,000 in perfect condition.

1955-’56 FORD THUNDERBIRD

The first generation 55’-56’ Ford Thunderbird appealed to the masses as a two seater luxury car designed for everyday use and dubbed the “personal car” of the 50’s. The Thunderbird’s original price was right around $2,700 with over 16,000 sold in the first year of production. Featuring a 292 Y-block V8 engine, Fordomatic or manual transmission, powered seats, and telescoping steering wheel, the 55’-56’ Thunderbird is a classic as apple pie and a reminder of what made America great. It’s also one of the best classic cars as the average price in today’s market averages around $29,000.

1951-’53 HUDSON HORNET CLUB COUPE

51-53 Hudson Hornet with OEM Wheels

Credit Via Flickr

One of the most memorable cars in American history is the Hudson Hornet and the most sought after racing cars in its day. The Hudson Hornet was popular in stock car racing with a straight six H-145 engine and at the time was the largest six displacement 6-cylinder engine in the world. Today, the Hudson Hornet is an icon of American history and as a collector car, valued at just under $20,000, making it possible for the average American to own one.

1967 CHEVROLET CORVETTE L88

Chevy L88 Corvette with OEM Wheels

Credit Via Flickr

The L88 was the last of the second generation Corvettes and got its name for the engine. The L88 engine in the 67’ Corvette resembles that of a racing engine and to date, Chevy has never offered anything like it since for regular production. In fact, the engine required 103-octane fuel used in the racing circuit and wasn’t widely available to the general public. As one of the best collector cars on the market today, the Corvette L88 is almost impossible to find as there were only 20 exact models produced. To get your hands on one will be an average of about $3 million, making it one of the rarest and sacred collectible cars on the market today.

1958 CHRYSLER 300D

19589 Chrysler 300D with OEM Wheels and Hubcaps
Credit Via Flickr

The first real muscle car produced in the U.S. the 1958 Chrysler 300D got its name because of the 380 horsepower Hemi V-8 engine, topping speeds of 130mph. As one of the best collector cars, only about 800 of 58’ Chrysler 300D sold between the hardtop and convertible version. The 58’ 300D was the last year Chrysler offered that version of the full-size Hemi V-8, making it even more sought after.In today’s market, there are only 55 remaining models according to the Chrysler 300 Club International and will cost an aggressive collector up to $200,000.

Classic cars will also be an American pastime, and these five collectors will continue to stand the test of time. If you have a classic car, help maintain its beauty with Blackburn Wheels. We offer alloy wheel refinishing and bumper re-chroming to restore your classic car to its original style. Contact us today to get started.

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